Former Albright Aide Rubin Joins Brunswick
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Former Albright Aide Rubin Joins Brunswick

James Rubin, who served as assistant secretary of state for public affairs in the Clinton administration and was chief spokesman for Madeleine Albright, is joining British-based corporate and financial communications specialist Brunswick Group as partner.

Paul Holmes

 

LONDON, May 4—James Rubin, who served as assistant secretary of state for public affairs in the Clinton administration and was chief spokesman for Madeleine Albright, is joining British-based corporate and financial communications specialist Brunswick Group as partner. Rubin, who recently moved to London with his wife, CNN correspondent Christiane Amanpour, will work from Brunswick’s offices in the U.K. and New York.

Rubin is the second high-profile American hire in the past two weeks for Brunswick, which recently announced that Hill & Knowlton litigation communications expert Mike Buckley is joining the New York office as a partner in New York. But unlike Buckley, Rubin will not be focused primarily on U.S. business. Instead he will help Brunswick develop international accounts—spanning continental Europe and North America—and provide senior level counsel to clients.

Says Tim Payne, a partner in Brunswick’s New York office, “We are increasingly helping our clients grapple with the problems that are unique to global companies. The problem today is not getting access to capital, but telling the company’s story effectively to the sources of that capital. If you can master that art working for the U.S. government, you can do it for anyone.”

While Brunswick in the U.K. has diversified in recent years from an investor relations and mergers and acquisitions specialist into a broader corporate communications consultancy—with expertise in public affairs—Payne says Rubin’s appointment does not signal an interest in setting up a lobbying operation on this side of the Atlantic. “We think that the skills James learned in Washington apply to the business and financial worlds,” he says.
According to a report in The Financial Times, Rubin turned down an offer from Goldman Sachs to join Brunswick. The FT says Brunswick partners typically earn about £100,000, with potential bonuses that can be double that amount.

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