Makovsky Hires Ad Agency Veteran to Lead Branding Practice
Charting the future of public relations
Holmes Report
CEO

Makovsky Hires Ad Agency Veteran to Lead Branding Practice

Makovsky + Company has appointed advertising industry veteran Timothy Kane as executive vice president in charge of its branding and visual communications practice. Kane served in senior creative executive positions at McCann Erickson, J. Walter Thompson and others.

Paul Holmes

NEW YORK—Makovsky + Company has appointed advertising industry veteran Timothy Kane as executive vice president in charge of its branding and visual communications practice.

Prior to joining Makovsky, Kane served in a number of senior creative executive positions with advertising agency giants McCann Erickson, J. Walter Thompson, Young & Rubicam and DDB, directing integrated communications programs for some of the world’s most recognized brands, including ExxonMobil, Gillette, Lucent, Motorola, Anheuser- Busch, Capital One, Unilever and Kraft. He has also spearheaded branding initiatives in the public sector, for the U.S. Department of State, the City of New York, the City of Chicago, National Public Radio and several major universities.

Says agency president Ken Makovsky, “As the internet has become more content-rich and visually focused, creating and managing the imagery associated with a company has become one of our key tasks, and a fundamental part of many public relations campaigns. It’s more important than ever to combine the traditional elements of corporate identity, marketing communications and online activities into a coherent, compelling, consistent program of visual branding.”

Makovsky says the appointment comes in response to clients’ desire to have their public relations counsel take a larger role in the development of their brands and the corresponding movement of creative talent away from traditional advertising agencies.

Adds Kane, “The truth is, some of the most breakthrough thinking in the entire field is coming out of the public relations industry. In public relations, you have a real understanding of the new relationship between people and brands. These days, people don’t buy brands; they join them. You don’t have ‘consumers;’ you have constituencies. You can’t just blast away at a passive audience; you have to engage them, on an emotional level, in an active dialogue.”

View Style:

Load 3 More
comments powered by Disqus