New Study Uses Klout To Identify Top Political Influencers
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New Study Uses Klout To Identify Top Political Influencers

A new study uses Klout to identify the top ten political influencers among the G20 countries.

Holmes Report

A new study uses Klout to identify the top ten political influencers in each of the G20 countries.

The 'G20 Influencers' report has been developed by Burson-Marsteller, which claims that Klout scores are the "standard for influence." The study covers every influential voices on Twitter in every G20 country except China, where Sina Weibo is measured instead.

Burson-Marsteller’s global public affairs and digital consultants drew up a list of close to 1,000 people on Twitter who are politically influential in the G20 nations. Klout then assessed and scored them against its influence metric, set on a scale from 1-100, measuring influence based upon a user’s ability to drive action.

The US, for example, is led by Anderson Cooper, Barack Obama and Bill Gates, and also features Ezra Klein, Mike Bloomberg and Mitt Romney in its top ten.

In the UK, Andrew Neil comes out on top, followed by such high-profile figures as Alastair Campbell, Ed Miliband and Guido Fawkes. China's top ten includes Yale professor Zhiwu Chen, economist Zhiguo Han and Google CEO Kaifu Lee. India is led by Mahindra chief Anand Mahindra, and politicians Digvijay Singh and Narendra Modi.

The study found that, over a 90-day span, the influencers it identified received an average of 56,713 re-tweets, and an average of 35,249 mentions. They also had an average of 255,458 Twitter followers.

“With more than 100 million active users sending billions of tweets every week, it is critical for those looking to impact the online political and public affairs discourse to know, follow and engage the influencers with the greatest ability to shape the online debate," said Burson-Marsteller CEO Mark Penn.

 

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