Porter Novelli to Help Revise Food Pyramid
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Porter Novelli to Help Revise Food Pyramid

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food, Nutrition and Consumer Service has selected Porter Novelli’s Washington office to help develop a new food guidance system to help motivate consumers to make healthy food choices.

Paul Holmes

WASHINGTON, D.C.—The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food, Nutrition and Consumer Service has selected Porter Novelli’s Washington office to help develop a new food guidance system to help motivate consumers to make healthy food choices. The new system will replace the Food Guide Pyramid, which Porter Novelli helped create in the early 1990s.

“This is a landmark win for Porter Novelli,” said Rob Gould, general manager of Porter Novelli, Washington, D.C.  “Our work with USDA to help design, test and implement a new food guidance system will be another milestone that builds on our heritage and continued commitment to national health and nutrition behavior change campaigns.”

The Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion says that 80 percent of Americans recognize the pyramid, which shows fats, oils and sugars at its apex, widening to feature grains and cereals at the broader base. But its research also indicates that few know what to do with the pyramid’s information about appropriate serving sizes and numbers of servings.

“We’ve got to reverse some trends,” says Eric Hentges, executive director of the Center. “We’ve got to connect with individuals. We’ve got to be able to communicate the major message of what’s appropriate for you.”

In addition to introducing the pyramid in 1991, Porter Novelli also worked on the 5-a-Day for Better Health campaign for Better Health Foundation and the National Cancer Institute, and the truth campaign, which encourages young people to rebel against tobacco marketing.

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