Big Think
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Holmes Report
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Big Think

It’s become a familiar story, almost a cliché, in the public relations agency business: veteran counselor, tired of the politics of big agencies and the pressures of big cities leaves to form her own firm, determined to provide better service.

Holmes Report

It’s become a familiar story, almost a cliché, in the public relations agency business: veteran counselor, tired of the politics of big agencies and the pressures of big cities leaves to form her own firm, determined to provide better service, improved access to senior talent, and reduced bureaucracy. But a couple of things make Big Think different. The first is that its founder, Barbara Hines, has unusually impressive credentials, having headed the consumer group at Porter Novelli, as well as the firm’s San Francisco office. The second is that Hines has been networking in the PR industry for years, and has access to an impressive cadre of talent, a “virtual agency” of seasoned professionals turned freelance but available to provide “best teams” to a wider variety of clients than most start-up firms can contemplate.
 
Big Think is only a year old, but it already boasts a pretty impressive client list, including such names as Abbott Laboratories, BigStep.com, Fresh Express, Lowes Foods, International Food House, and Zinglet. The focus is on strategy rather than execution, and interesting assignments in the past 12 months have included work on bioterrorism and agriterrorism issues, food safety and food security issues, working with a national consortium of food companies, food industry associations, food related regulatory agencies and law enforcement agencies convened to develop an industry-wide response to mitigate and manage potential threats. 
 
While the firm’s greatest strength is in the marketing arena—Hines has 20 years experience in the consumer sector, and executive vice president Elizabeth England has expertise in the retail and food and beverage industries—its senior level counseling team can also offer guidance on crisis and issues management, particularly in the food and beverage arena, and corporate reputation management. With a structure designed to offer maximum flexibility and minimum overhead, Big Think enjoyed healthy growth in 2001 and is with strong word of mouth is well positioned for continued success in 2002.
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