Cushman Amberg Communications
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Cushman Amberg Communications

Celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2002, Cushman/Amberg Communications has been around longer than most of its Midwestern competitors, and has a lot in common with some of the region’s other long-established firms.

Holmes Report

Celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2002, Cushman/Amberg Communications has been around longer than most of its Midwestern competitors, and has a lot in common with some of the region’s other long-established firms, albeit on a smaller scale. According to president Tom Amberg, who took over the helm and added his name to the door in the mid 90s, “We are more like a Special Forces unit than an army. We offer clients senior, experienced people to handle their business, and our focus is on helping them build their business, not just accrue publicity.”
 
For example, in 2001 the firm went to work for Freeman Energy Corporation and its subsidiary, Freeman United Coal Mining Company. The company was on the verge of losing a $400 million contract to a public utility and having to shut a mine with the loss of 225 jobs when Cushman/Amberg was called in. The firm focused public pressure to force the utility to back down from its threat to stop taking coal from the mine, orchestrating activity by the company, the mineworker’s union, citizen groups, and the political community. The utility backed down four days later, and the mine was saved.
 
Amberg says the firm has seen the biggest growth in its public affairs and crisis management practices, and overall growth for the year is likely to be about 10 percent, pushing revenues past the $3 million mark. New business included assignments from Donlar Biosyntrex and InterCall, while the firm continues its work for major clients such US Cellular and DeVry, as well as Freeman Energy.
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