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Stanton Communications

Last year was the year in which Stanton Communications finally added a formal public affairs practice, which wouldn’t be such a big deal if Stanton was headquartered anywhere other than Washington, D.C.

Holmes Report

Last year was the year in which Stanton Communications finally added a formal public affairs practice, which wouldn’t be such a big deal if Stanton was headquartered anywhere other than Washington, D.C., where public affairs is the starting point for most firms. Stanton became one of the leading independent firm in the D.C. marketplace by providing marketing communications and crisis management advice to a broad array of corporate and not-for-profit clients. It always offered public affairs as part of the mix, but only in 2001, with the appointment of Ketchum and North American Insulation Manufacturers Association veteran Catherine Imus, did it formalize a practice offering strategic planning, grassroots mobilization, coalition building, and legislative monitoring and tracking.
 
The firm experienced a significant contraction in its technology practice (despite the addition of new clients including Grotech Capital Group, Global Switch, and Condor Technology Solutions) but experienced significant growth from existing clients, and picked up accounts including W.L. Gore & Associates, the Delaware-based corporation best known for its Gore-Tex brand, which selected Stanton to provide corporate communication counsel. The firm will end the year up about 20 percent, with fees of just over $3 million.
 
Interesting assignments included support for The National Federation of the Blind, which sponsored blind mountaineer Erik Weihenmayer’s successful ascent of Mount Everest, and a regional communications campaign—including PR and advertising—for Conectiv Power Delivery.
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