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Influencers Post And Enjoy Selfies, Coyne Report Says
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Influencers Post And Enjoy Selfies, Coyne Report Says

More than 50% of influencers still enjoy seeing selfies in their social media feeds and more than 85% engage in the behavior themselves.

Holmes Report

Influencers Post And Enjoy Selfies, Coyne Report Says

More than 50% of influencers still enjoy seeing selfies in their social media feeds and more than 85% engage in the behavior themselves, with the majority posting a selfie once a week on their social media channels.

Coyne PR’s State of the Selfie report found that Facebook and Instagram are first and second as the favored platforms for selfies. 

“Selfies as a mode of communication have saturated our society,” says Marie Baker, vice president of social media at Coyne. “It’s vital that we dissect and understand their role in popular culture and apply that knowledge to building effective brand communication strategies.”  

Researchers are now looking at how selfies are connected to attitudes, characteristics and other psychological behaviors, Baker says. And college courses in London and Boston now explore the artistic production, psychology, and societal impact of the selfie.

Other research findings:

  • For the nine percent of respondents who don't post selfies, the main reason is simply that they would rather post pictures of something else.
  • Harvard University researchers found that human arms have grown longer by an entire half inch in the past two years alone--because of selfies. They predict human arms will become four to five inches longer by the close of the century.
  • A study from The Body Shop found that British women spend 753 hours of their life capturing the perfect online profile picture. This means they are spending over a month on just this activity (in aggregate).
  • Ohio State University researchers found that adult males who post a lot of selfies are more likely to exhibit psychopathic or narcissistic qualities than those who don't.
  • Selfiecity.net (a new media project) found that women take significantly more selfies than men – 61.6%  in New York alone.

 The full State of the Selfie report includes:

  • The Science of Selfies – Survey results from Coyne Connect (the agency’s exclusive panel of online influencers) and a look at academic selfie studies
  • Body Language – A deep dive into the latest trends in selfie culture
  • Selfie-ventions – A review of useful, unique and unusual inventions inspired by the selfie
  • The Great Selfie Debate – A selfie fan and selfie hater go head-to-head
  • Express Your Selfie – A how-to guide for taking a great selfie.
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