FH Picks Up Social Marketing Assignment
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FH Picks Up Social Marketing Assignment

Reclaiming Futures has selected Fleishman-Hillard Portland to lead its national communications program. Reclaiming Futures is a $21 million national initiative aimed at mobilizing communities to help teens overcome drugs, alcohol and crime.

Paul Holmes

PORTLAND, OR—Reclaiming Futures has selected Fleishman-Hillard Portland to lead its national communications program. Reclaiming Futures, a program of The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is a $21 million national initiative aimed at mobilizing communities to help teens overcome drugs, alcohol, and crime. FH is helping build public and political support for this five-year program. 

“Reclaiming Futures is a new approach to helping teenagers caught in the cycle of drugs, alcohol, and crime. It’s a public health concern that deserves national attention,” says Patty Farrell, senior vice president of FH Portland.

The firm will work with the Reclaiming Futures national headquarters based at the Regional Research Institute for Human Services of the Graduate School of Social Work at Portland State University. A year ago, FH worked with Reclaiming Futures to announce the awarding of the first round of grants to select communities around the nation.

According to Laura Burney Nissen, director of Reclaiming Futures, “Fleishman-Hillard’s strengths in media relations, social issues, and public affairs, along with their emphasis on research, are ensuring that we powerfully deliver the message that treating alcohol and drug abuse among teens reduces crime, saves money, and builds stronger communities.”

Reclaiming Futures concentrates its grant making in four goal areas: to assure that all Americans have access to quality healthcare at reasonable cost; to improve the quality of care and support for people with chronic health conditions; to promote healthy communities and lifestyles; and to reduce the personal, social and economic harm caused by substance abuse: tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs.

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