New Weber Shandwick Unit to Deliver "Multiscreen" Campaigns
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New Weber Shandwick Unit to Deliver "Multiscreen" Campaigns

Weber Shandwick is expanding its interactive and emerging media capabilities with the launch of screengrab, a new global unit that will design and deliver multi-screen campaigns.

Paul Holmes

NEW YORK—Weber Shandwick is expanding its interactive and emerging media capabilities with the launch of screengrab, a new global unit that will design and deliver multi-screen campaigns. The screengrab team features expert practitioners in a range of disciplines including web development, mobile and viral marketing, search, on-line outreach, community engagement, and social and traditional media relations.

“screengrab is an evolution of our interactive and new media strategy that reflects the proliferation of screens in our lives,” says B. Bonin Bough, executive vice president of screengrab.  “The screen, whether it is a mobile phone, MP3 player, laptop, gaming console, TV or a traditional movie theater screen, is the window to every consumer in the rapidly shifting world of technology and media.”

The firm recently conducted a study of consumer screen habits with sister company KRC Research, and found that the average person is likely to be using more than three screens daily for information and entertainment.

“With screen profusion comes the need for communications fusion,” says Gail Heimann, president of Weber Shandwick’s New York office and co-president of the firm’s global consumer marketing practice. “It’s no longer about creating programs for each screen, but about designing 360º campaigns to leverage the power of the right screens at the right times.  That’s the screengrab mandate.”

The survey findings challenge several perceptions about screen use. It found, for example, that four out of ten moms surveyed own a portable gaming device, with a quarter of them are spending up to five hours a week using it; a quarter of seniors expect to spend more time using computers and cell phones in the next five years; and boomers are using cells, laptops and portable gaming consoles to play games wherever they go.

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