U.S. Army Taps H&K to Publicize Welfare, Morale Programs
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U.S. Army Taps H&K to Publicize Welfare, Morale Programs

The U.S. Army Community and Family Support Center has selected Hill & Knowlton to provide corporate communications services in support of its morale, welfare and recreation programs.

Paul Holmes

NEW YORK, September 1—The U.S. Army Community and Family Support Center (CFSC) has selected Hill & Knowlton to provide corporate communications services in support of its morale, welfare and recreation (MWR) programs. H&K beat out two other major agencies for the business, which could be worth as much as $2 million over the next five years.
 
According to H&K managing director Lily Loh, who will be managing the account from the firm’s New York office, it will include both internal communications—targeting the troops who benefit from the MWR programs—and external communications. “It’s important to raise awareness of existing programs, but it’s also important to reach external audiences in terms of recruitment,” says Loh.
 
MWR directly supports Army readiness by providing a variety of community, soldier and family support activities and services. The goal of the MWR program is to ensure that soldiers and military families enjoy the same quality of life as the Americans they defend. The program includes social, fitness, recreational, educational, and other activities that enhance community life, promote mental and physical fitness, from concerts such as the Miller Genuine Draft Army Concert Tour to sporting events such as the Bowl Hog Wild tournament that offers a Harley-Davidson motorcycle as grand prize.
 
“The Army’s Community and Family Support Center operates 250 diverse MWR programs dispersed among some 90 global Army installations,” says Laurie Gibson, CFSC senior marketing manager.  “We believe Hill & Knowlton has the capabilities to assist in increasing recognition of these programs and our efforts to support readiness, recruiting, and retaining highly qualified soldiers.”
 
Loh says the firm’s initial efforts will be focused domestically. “Our first challenge will be articulating what these programs are and how they connect to the army’s mission. Once we have been able to deploy our communications efforts within U.S. facilities they will be expanded internationally.”
 
The MWR programs are entirely separate from the army’s current “Army of One” rebranding efforts.
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