Goodman Media
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Goodman Media

Goodman and his staff practice media relations the way it used to be practiced: they can come up with the big attention-grabbing publicity stunt, they can find the right story angle to reach top-tier media, and they can forge lasting relationships.

Holmes Report

In some quarters, good old-fashioned media relations is a forgotten art. Many of Goodman Media’s competitors would rather bill $250 an hour for counseling and strategizing, while some believe that media relations consists of sending out a press release to every media contact in their database and others would rather delegate press contact to a specialist practice rather than having the account staff handle it. But Goodman and his staff practice media relations the way it used to be practiced: they can come up with the big attention-grabbing publicity stunt, they can find the right story angle to reach top-tier media, and they can forge lasting relationships—built on trust and professionalism—with key reporters.
 
Founder Tom Goodman spent 20 years in corporate public relations, working for both ABC and CBS, and so the firm’s initial clients were almost all media companies. Today, the firm continues to represent some high profile media outfits, including Discovery Channel and Court TV, but after Goodman was asked to handle public relations for British Airways, as it unveiled a half-size model of the Concorde in Times Square, he added a broader range of clients, ranging from Sony and General Motors to Chelsea Market and the National Dance Institute.
 
Goodman is now working on the upcoming launch of The New York Sun, backed by Canadian newspaper magnate Conrad Black, and with Neiman Marcus Direct, and has been solidifying its leadership team, adding Lesley Zeller Schwartz as vice president of the media and entertainment group in 2001.
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