Maloney & Fox
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Maloney & Fox

A midsize firm such as Maloney & Fox can take on a small, entrepreneurial company and still make money. But it can also find a Fortune 100 company that’s looking for creative, outside-the-box thinking and isn’t afraid to take a chance.

Holmes Report

 

One of the nice things about being a creative boutique is that clients come in all shapes and sizes. Unlike the large agencies, a midsize firm such as Maloney & Fox can take on a small, entrepreneurial company and still make money. But it can also find a Fortune 100 company that’s looking for creative, outside-the-box thinking and isn’t afraid to take a chance. That’s why the client list at the three-year old Maloney & Fox ranges from Microsoft, which recently tapped the firm to assist in the re-launch of MSN Explorer, to dot-com bookseller Alibris.com, to ornamental horticulture specialist Green2Go—from blue-chip to dot-com to mom-and-pop.

Principals Brian Maloney and Margie Fox have a wealth of agency experience, large and small, and a background as generalists, equally adept at product and corporate communications, consumer and business-to-business marketing, old media and new. They’re smart, they’re cool, they’re uninhibited—and they get results. They hire people who are bright and creative, and they work with a team of consultants and freelancers that offer clients more depth than most 16-person agencies.Big client wins in 2000 included heavyweight brands such as Microsoft, Midas, and Radioshack, as well as a handful of dot-com clients, including ServiceEngine.com, Shutterfly.com, and Peranet.com.

The agency also added offices in San Francisco and Los Angeles last year, as a way of keeping in touch with west coast clients, and bringing a “west coast sensibility” to some of the creative work. And it brought in Pamela Adkins, a veteran of the Washington, D.C., media and public affairs scene, to strengthen the firm’s client service and professional development initiatives.

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