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US Journalists Prefer News Via Email, Not Social Media
Holmes Report
Holmes Report
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US Journalists Prefer News Via Email, Not Social Media

Almost two-thirds of US journalists say their single most preferred method for the electronic delivery of press releases and other written information was via an embedded email message.

Holmes Report

Almost two-thirds (65%) of US journalists say their single most preferred method for the electronic delivery of press releases and other written information was via an embedded email message. In the same survey, more than 77% said their least preferred method of electronic delivery was via messages or postings on Twitter, Facebook, or other messaging platforms.

The study, conducted by Roher Public Relations, worked from a sample of more than 2000 reporters, editors, and contributors in print, broadcast, and online media covering trade, business and consumer-interest topics.

“This may spark some controversy, but it should also provide some useful guidance to public relations professionals,” says Richard Roher, president of the firm. “Just four percent of respondents identified Twitter or Facebook as their most preferred method for receiving news. There are probably media segments where that percentage would be higher, but looking across a broad spectrum of press, email is unequivocally the way most journalists prefer to receive information electronically.”

Roher said the results for the questions pertaining to receiving graphics were similarly one-sided in favor of email, with most respondents, 60%, rating “email with an attachment” with a five, their most preferred means of receiving graphics. A total of 70% rated “email with an attachment” with a four or five as their most preferred means of delivery. Social media, whether by messaging or posting, was deemed the least preferred delivery method by 80% or more of the respondents.

“Among those who did express a preference for social media, the results for Twitter and Facebook were nearly identical, with no favorite of one over the other,” Roher also said.

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